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(Source: jingae)

mucholderthen:

Pictures taken by Norwegian sailor Oyvind Tangen on board a research ship 1700 miles south of Cape Town, South Africa  [ X ]
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Via Australian Antarctic Division:

WHY ICEBERGS CAN HAVE COLORS AND STRIPES

Icebergs are formed from glacial ice that has built up from snow falling on the Antarctic continent over millennia;  glacial ice consists of pure fresh water.  The ice flows slowly to the coast and breaks off either from glaciers or from ice shelves.

ICE SHELVES
As seawater is drawn deep under the ice shelves by the oceanic currents, it becomes 
super-cooled  Under certain conditions it can freeze to the base of the ice shelf.

Because this ice is formed from seawater, it differs from the freshwater ice of the ice shelf. Often, the frozen seawater contains organic matter and minerals, causing it to have a different color and texture.

Thus icebergs broken off from the ice shelves may show layers of the pure blue-white glacial ice and greener ice formed from frozen seawater. As the bergs become fragmented and sculpted by the wind and waves, the different colored layers can develop striking patterns.

GLACIERS
Pure glacial ice, too, can exhibit striking color patterns. This is thought to be a result of melting that can occur on the continent before the bergs break off. Crevasses high on the Antarctic plateau can fill with melt water and then refreeze, producing layering of blue ice within a white ice matrix.

After calving, they begin eroding and the alignment of the stripes can become irregular, leading to icebergs with spectacular appearances.

- Dr Steve Nicol, Program Leader, Australian Antarctic Division

(via bikerblond)

odditiesoflife:

Sagano Bamboo Forest, Japan

This stunning bamboo forest is located in the Arashiyama district on the west outskirts of Kyoto, Japan. It is one of the most amazing natural sites in the country. An interesting fact about Sagano Bamboo Forest is the sound that the wind makes while it blows through the bamboo. Amazingly enough, this sound has been voted on as one of the “one hundred must-be-preserved sounds of Japan” by the Japanese government. Another interesting fact – the railing on the sides of the road is composed out of old, dry and fallen parts of bamboo.

(via bikerblond)

jaymug:

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jaymug:

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